USA Today

“We really don’t have evidence that higher-end hearing instruments are needed.”

Researchers are looking at ways to make hearing tests and hearing aids easier to get and less expensive, says Gordon Hughes, the institute’s program director for clinical trials. “Suppose you were able to offer a less-expensive hearing aid” at a retail outlet, like Walmart, he says. Already, they’re available online, and laptop or telephone hearing […]

Researchers are looking at ways to make hearing tests and hearing aids easier to get and less expensive, says Gordon Hughes, the institute’s program director for clinical trials. “Suppose you were able to offer a less-expensive hearing aid” at a retail outlet, like Walmart, he says. Already, they’re available online, and laptop or telephone hearing tests are being used in some countries.

Sklar says studies are looking at the possibilities for improving access to affordable, effective hearing aids. Generic hearing aids that don’t require fitting by an audiologist could potentially serve 80% to 90% of seniors who have hearing loss, he says. “We really don’t have evidence that higher-end hearing instruments are needed.”

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